logo
Archive

Are Horses Considered Livestock In Maryland

author
Brent Mccoy
• Thursday, 17 December, 2020
• 44 min read

Livestock is most commonly considered animals kept or raised in a farm or ranch setting and used in a commercial enterprise. The raising of livestock is an agricultural endeavor that promotes the preservation of green space and a way of life that many in today’s society desire.

horse horses maryland draft gentle rescue jellybean giants breeder seized pounds underweight take washington washingtonpost bmp
(Source: www.washingtonpost.com)

Contents

Even today, horses are still kept and raised on a farm or ranch and are used in a commercial enterprise. The United States horse industry is a major business that makes a significant contribution to the economic well-being of the entire country.

Many state departments of agriculture are also providing valuable assistance to the horse industry through research and regulatory programs. If livestock status is taken away from horses, there is a possibility of losing the already limited financial support equines receive from the USDA for research, regulation, and disaster relief.

Many states are now passing what are commonly referred to as “limited liability laws.” One of the purposes of these state laws is to provide stable owners, equine event organizers, and trail ride organizers protection from lawsuits that may arise if an individual is injured while attending or participating in such an event. However, many of these state laws are not limited only to horses ; they encompass all livestock or farm animals.

Currently, under federal tax law, commercial horse owners and breeders are treated as farmers. The decision to send a horse to a processing facility where it will be slaughtered, like other livestock, for human consumption is a personal one that should not be mandated by law.

Taking this option away from individuals could make conditions worse for some horses. If a horse cannot be sold at a sale because it may go to a processing facility, it might become a candidate for abuse.

(Source: www.youtube.com)

In most cases, county or state laws make it illegal simply to bury a horse on your property or dump the carcass in a landfill due to human health concerns. To some, the cost of disposal for horses might be so high that they are simply left to stand in a field until their death.

These facilities must comply with strict federal and state codes designed for the care of these horses. These codes govern euthanasia, as well as the methods used, and provide for the safety of the meat produced.

Because of the variety of roles horses play in our society, the law’s treatment of them covers a wide range of often competing goals. Some laws treat them as livestock, while others describe them as precious national symbols and extend significant protections to them.

Unlike many companion animals, dogs and cats in particular, horses are expensive and require a lot of maintenance. Whatever their treatment under the law, it is undeniable that horses continue to play an important role in our society, as beasts of burden, symbols of the American spirit, and members of many human families.

They are used as beasts of burden on farms, displayed for their beauty at competitive shows, and treated as companion animals by many families around the country. Because of the variety of roles horses play in our society, the law's treatment of them covers a wide spectrum of often competing goals.

horse farm tour maryland cecildaily breeders association visitors darlington murmur during open
(Source: www.cecildaily.com)

Some laws treat them as mere livestock, while others describe them as precious national symbols and mandate significant protections for them. Their senses are generally considered to be superior to those of humans, especially their eyes, the positioning of which allows them to see a range of vision over 350 degrees.

Though historically considered unintelligent, more recent studies suggest that horses excel at simple learning and are also able to solve advanced cognitive problems. The genus Equus, to which modern domesticated horses belong, probably originated in North America around 4 million years ago, and then spread to the Eurasian land mass over, presumably, the Bering Strait.

Interestingly, however, the late prehistoric North American horses died out around 11,000 years ago. The most sensational role historically has been their use in warfare, where they have often proven to be decisive strategic factors due to their speed and strength.

However, their most lasting role has been as a means of human transportation, engendering the expansion of various peoples across vast tracts of land. Indeed, to many in America, including the United States Congress, horses are a proud symbol of westward expansion and development.

Though horses are utilized far less today than in the past, they still play varied and important roles in human society. In many cases, horses offer the best means of completing a task while balancing environmental concerns, such as avoiding damaging delicate soil or disrupting nature preserves with gas powered vehicles.

wild assateague horse maryland alamy
(Source: www.alamy.com)

Finally, horses are often brought into families as companion animals, enriching human lives through the reciprocal formation of meaningful social bonds. Like any animal, horses are affected by multiple legal regimes at the state and federal level.

Passed by Congress in 1971, the Africa was implemented to address the drastic decline of wild horses and burros on America’s plains (16 U.S.C.S. At one point numbering in the millions, by the time this legislation was put into force the wild horse population had shrunk to around 17, 000.

Still, it can be hard at times to discern exactly what laws and protections are applicable to particular horses in any given statutory scheme. The ambiguity in the New York definitions is typical of the general tension in the law’s treatment of horses.

Because of this, horses are treated as livestock by some laws and companion animals by others, often with results that are difficult to reconcile logically. While there are no horse slaughter facilities currently operating in the United States, it is important to note that only four states have explicitly banned horse slaughter or the sale of horse meat for human consumption, five if you count Mississippi which has declared horse meat to be unfit for human consumption.

Certainly one part of the explanation is simply popular disgust at divergent and foreign dietary norms. Horses in America are inextricably woven into our national narrative, recognized even by Congress as symbols of the “pioneer spirit.” Livestock or not, they are often treated as companion animals by families, as aesthetic objects by connoisseurs, and as protected wild animals by the United States government.

assateague island horse national wild killed stallion seashore park accident horses maryland sir vehicle struck gruff causeway rocky nps parks
(Source: www.washingtonpost.com)

If the current political capital being expended on behalf of horses at both the state and national level is any indication, then the arc of horse welfare certainly seems to be bending away from their traditional role as beasts of burden and towards there absolute admission into that pantheon of treasured American animals, next to dogs, cats, and bald eagles. Although Teller County does not enforce private subdivision covenants, you should also check with your property owners’ association, if any, for restrictions on keeping livestock.

Corrals, stalls, or barns must be at least 50 feet from property lines, residences, and water wells. Domestic, noncommercial use of poultry or fowl shall include but not be limited to, chickens, turkeys, pigeons, small birds and ducks.

Non-commercial, domestic hoofed livestock shall include, but not be limited to, horses, cattle, mules, sheep, goats, and swine. Young animals under 6 months of age may be kept until weaned without counting toward the allowable limit.

Although the entire lot may be fenced, a containment area (corral) must be provided where the animals will normally be penned and supplementary fed. All corrals, stalls, and barns shall be at least 50 feet from any residence, domestic well and property lines.

The containment area (corral) should be adequate for the number of animals involved and shall not exceed 10% of the gross lot acreage or 2 acres whichever is least. The possession of animals will not be allowed to create health hazards to the surrounding properties.

horse maryland farm horses
(Source: darlenesvintagepostcards.com)

On lots from 2.0 to 5.99 acres in size, a maximum number of 15 poultry, fowl and rabbits is permitted. A containment area for the poultry or fowl shall be required and not be closer than 50 feet to any property line.

Small livestock must be properly housed (i.e. rabbit hutches) and not be located closer to any property line than the zone district setback allows. On lots that are greater than 5.99 acres in size, there shall not be a limit on the number of poultry, fowl or small livestock allowed except when the keeping of such is not for domestic, consumptive, hobby, or pet uses by the residents of the parcel.

On lots less than 1 acre in size, a maximum number of 4 poultry, fowl and rabbits is permitted. On lots from 1.1 to 2.00 acres in size, a maximum number of 10 poultry, fowl and rabbits is permitted.

On lots from 2.10 to 5.99 acres in size, a maximum number of 15 poultry, fowl and rabbits is permitted. On lots that are greater than 5.99 acres in size, there shall not be a limit on the number of poultry, fowl or small livestock allowed except when the keeping of such is not for domestic, consumptive, hobby, or pet uses by the residents of the parcel.

Any place or premises used in whole or in part for the purpose of breeding and/or boarding of dogs or cats, principally for compensation or profit. Any place or premises used in whole or in part for the purpose of breeding and/or boarding of dogs or cats, for private enjoyment, in excess of 6 animals of a specific species, over 4 months of age.

wild horses beach assateague maryland horse island national seashore too close company roams park caption campers regard without npr md
(Source: npr.org)

Animals that do not meet the required residency statement as shown on the health certificate usually need an import permit obtained from the USDA. The USDA requires export health certificates to be completed in English.

An export certificate is considered fully complete and valid only after it has been endorsed and stamped with the official export stamp by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CIA) veterinary inspector. This is usually the district veterinarian or veterinary inspector responsible for the geographic district in which the herd of origin is located, or another veterinary inspector if prior arrangements have been made.

The period of time that an export certificate remains valid is not only based on the date that the completed certificate is endorsed by a CIA veterinarian, but may also be based on the actual date that the inspection, testing, or treatment commenced. Animals: Cattle, sheep, goats, other ruminants, swine, horses, asses, mules, zebras, dogs, cats, and poultry.

Birds: All members of the class Ave's, including hatching eggs, other than “poultry.” Zoological Park: For export purposes, a professionally operated zoo, park, garden, or other place maintained under the constant surveillance of a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine, for the exhibition of live animals, pigeons or birds, for the purpose of public recreation or education.

Poultry: For the purposes of export to the U.S., chickens, ducks, geese, swans, turkeys, doves, pheasants, grouse, pigeons, partridges, quails, guinea fowl, and peafowl of all ages, including “poultry” hatching eggs. No import permits are required from the USDA if the animals are presented for import at one of the U.S. land border ports listed at the end of this section and if they meet the specific requirements described in the following sections.

horses horse maryland running heritage
(Source: www.visitmaryland.org)

Any livestock, poultry or birds that are destined to enter the U.S. by air, sea or an inland port of entry other than those listed below. Please note that there are no designated land border ports on the Canadian/United States border to Alaska, thus an import permit is required prior to entry into Alaska in order to facilitate process of inspections castrated sheep and goats for feeding all animals (except horses), poultry, or birds if the animals, poultry, or birds have been imported into Canada from a country other than the U.S., and have been resident in Canada less than 60 days, excluding any Canadian quarantine period; Horses imported from a country other than the USA may not require an import permit if exported before 60 days (excluding any Canadian quarantine period) if some other special conditions are met.

Fish and Wildlife Service 4401 North Fairfax Drive, Room 432 Arlington, Virginia 22203 Telephone: 703-358-2104 Facsimile: 1-800-358-2104 Although it is recognized that each state has the prerogative to establish import movement controls that may be more stringent than the national (USDA) health requirements, the state authorities cannot prevent the entry into the U.S. from Canada of animals that meet established federal conditions.

It is the exporter's responsibility to ensure that any additional requirements are met through arrangements made with the importer either on the arrival of the animals or in advance of their departure. Table Note a Because of limited inspection services at some ports of entry, exporters should be advised to schedule the arrival of their animals with the USDA / Aphid veterinarian.

In both slaughter and non-slaughter categories, the animals must have been: born in the U.S. or Canada, or were legally imported into Canada from a region recognized by the USDA as a region not restricted due to BSE. Under no movement restrictions within Canada or the U.S. for at least 60 days prior to export to the U.S. inspected and found to be free from any evidence of communicable disease and, as far as it can be determined, must not have been exposed to any such disease during the 60 days immediately preceding the date of shipment.

Born on or after March 1, 1999, which is the date determined by the Aphid to be the effective enforcement of a ruminant-to-ruminant feed ban. In Canada in a period during which the country must have been free from foot-and-mouth disease, interest, surrey (trypanosomiasis), and contagious bovine pleuropneumonia.

volunteer horse operated maryland rescue
(Source: mdhorserescue.net)

Individually identified with an approved Canadian ear tag (or any tag deemed equivalent under the livestock identification and traceability program), applied prior to each animal's entry into the U.S. inspected and certified for export within 30 days of export by an accredited veterinarian. The choice of method rests with the AV, based on their due diligence and professional veterinary judgement.

A record of the methods employed in determining the age of cattle or bison is to be maintained for each shipment certified by an AV. Records of the method used must be kept for three years for audit purpose (such as a note written on the copy of the export certificate retained by the AV).

Information about measures employed for aging is to be made available to CIA upon request. Any animal that in the professional opinion of the AV may be older than the March 1st, 1999 birthdate, based on visual appraisal, dentition, or reviews of producer records, is to be removed from the shipment and is not eligible for export.

Visual inspection: It is recognized that an experienced veterinary practitioner is able to estimate the age of cattle (based on breed characteristic knowledge). The accredited veterinarian is often knowledgeable about the herds of origin of the cattle to be exported, such as from beef feedlots or veal operations.

Visual inspection should only be used as a sole method for a shipment when the accredited veterinarian is confident that the animals were born on or after March 1st, 1999. If there is any concern that the animal(s) being inspected were born prior to March 1st, 1999 the AV should choose option b or c (below) for age verification.

maryland horse horses seized breeder largest ever rescue impoundment operations washingtonpost
(Source: www.washingtonpost.com)

These and other documents are supporting evidence that may be acceptable to the accredited veterinarian indicating the animal was born on or after March 1, 1999. Animals with no visible incisors and/or missing molars (“summers”) should be aged using another method.

On its left, we observe an erupting third permanent incisor, top of tooth above the gum, meaning the animal is 30 months of age. On its left, an erupting third permanent incisor with top corners of the tooth above the gum, meaning the animal is 30 months of age or older.

The fourth illustration represents a full set of permanent incisors. The sixth and last illustration represent permanent incisors showing wear and space between the teeth.

The rounded arch of the incisors gradually becomes nearly straight by the twelfth (12) year of age in cattle. The teeth become more triangular, distinctly separated, and show progressive wearing to stubs.

Additional certification requirements and procedures for non-slaughter category (breeding, shows, feeders, etc. ): 3.1 Cattle exported on the HA1941 export of cattle or bison to the United States certificate must: be permanently and humanely identified with a distinct and legible “Can” mark that has been applied with a freeze brand or hot iron, that is easily visible on the live animal.

farms yearling marathon maryland keeneland colt horse sells bay association law
(Source: marylandthoroughbred.com)

Apply the mark to each animal's right hip, high on the tail-head and not less than two inches nor more than three inches high; or bear a legible tattoo of the letters “CAN” applied to the inside of the left ear. Tattoo pliers recommended by a manufacturer for use in cattle should be used for tattoo application; or be permanently and humanely identified by any other alternative method approved by the USDA before the shipment reaches the port of entry into the U.S.

In addition to the approved radio frequency identification (RFID) tag, bison that do not have a permanent marking as described above must bear in the opposite ear a secondary dangle tag (available from the Canadian Bison Association) bearing the same official identification number as the approved RFID tag. Testing must be performed in accordance with CFIA's Bovine Tuberculosis Manual of Procedures.

Accredited veterinarians must immediately report all CFT reactors to the CIA and all CFT reactors must be tested by a CIA veterinarian with the ancillary comparative cervical tuberculin test (CCT). Please note that even if they tested negative to the CCT, CFT reactors are not eligible for export to the US.

This protocol must be followed for all CFT reactors, including those that were tested in order to comply with a States requirement. Contrary to slaughter animals, one export certificate per truck is required.

Specific certification requirements and procedures for slaughter category: Cattle and bison certified for slaughter in the U.S. on HA2183 do not require tattoos, brands, or other identification, as described in section 3.1 in this module. The certificate HA2183, as described below, requires the entry of specific statements concerning the routing of shipments to slaughter.

assateague horses island november wild national park seashore horse maryland nps census service rocky jq grand population lisa herd gov
(Source: www.grandcanyonnews.com)

The specific number of animals in each truck must be recorded by the agent/owner/exporter on the annex page before departure. For shipments of slaughter animals of several truck loads, the first truck in the shipment requires the original certificate signed and endorsed by the CIA official veterinarian, plus two copies.

Subsequent trucks require three copies of the Canadian health certificate, one of which must bear a red CIA export seal on every page. When completing the HA2183 Export of Cattle or Bison for Immediate Slaughter to the United States of America certificate, the routing of the shipment must be based on information provided by the exporter.

The routing starts at the U.S. port of entry and must include all main roads to be followed in the U.S. No strikeouts are required on the certificate, except selecting cattle or bison, as appropriate in the line just above the signature block at the bottom of the certificate. The total number of animals inspected and listed on the certificate is to be placed in the blank next to the line mentioned in point c. The annex of the certificate (identification page) may be substituted with a list of animals containing the same information as this page, including the number of animals in the truck.

In addition, the statement blocks stating the number of animals in the truck and the name of the agent/owner/exporter must also appear on the substituted last page in the same manner as in the annex. An export manifest is available on the Website of the Canadian Cattle Identification Agency and Agri-Traçabilité Québec.

The “row” column is only a sequential numerical entry (1, 2, 3, …) Its purpose is to facilitate discussions between the USDA and the CIA when they have questions about one or many animals. Although it is not a USDA requirement that the ear tag numbers be listed in ascending numerical order on the certificate, accredited veterinarians are encouraged to complete the certificates in this manner.

assateague horses pony wild feral horse island bites attack animals park bite humans maryland national washington behaving recent badly seashore
(Source: www.washingtonpost.com)

This practice will facilitate inspection at the U.S. port of entry and minimize delays. If age is determined by dentition or visual inspection, an estimate in years may be used.

The accredited veterinarian must complete the export health certificate by entering all the necessary information. The completed and signed health certificate (including name in block capitals) will be submitted to CIA for review, and if all requirements are met, it will be endorsed.

Any incomplete export certificates will be returned to the accredited veterinarian for completion. Note : the USDA have confirmed that they do not require an original signature from the accredited veterinarian on the export certificates HA1941, HA2183 and HA2610.

Therefore, accredited veterinarians may choose to transmit these certificates for endorsement to the CIA district office according to the regular method described in Module 4.1 (personal or sealed envelope delivery), or transmit these export certificates by fax or electronically as long as the following conditions are met: Accredited veterinarians who wish to send export certificates to a district office via fax or e-mail must first inform the district veterinarian of their intention and must provide the fax number or the e-mail address that will be used.

Only fax numbers or e-mail addresses associated with the issuing accredited veterinarian will be accepted. Certificates received by fax or electronically must be printed on legal size paper.

horses wild maryland beaches usa west today
(Source: traveltips.usatoday.com)

Before signing these certificates, endorsing CIA veterinarians will ascertain that they contain a valid issuing signature and that it originated from an approved fax or e-mail address. No strikeouts are necessary for the animals not loaded, but the owner/agent/exporter must record, on the day of shipment, the number of animals in each truck in the designated spot on each copy of the certificate that will accompany that truck.

Cattle exported, other than for immediate slaughter, should be normally unloaded at the U.S. port of entry for individual inspection at the discretion of the USDA veterinarian. For bison, if no satisfactory handling installations are available at the border, a USDA veterinarian will provide an inspection at their final destination in the U.S.

Trucks transporting slaughter animals will be sealed at the U.S. port of entry for direct movement to the designated slaughterhouse. The shipment must be accompanied by U.S. Veterinary Services Form 17-29 Declaration of Importation and the official Canadian health certificate (HA1941 or HA2183).

It has never been allowed to export feeder/breeder/show animals in multiple trucks, and we have been informed by the USDA that Isis could have problems with animals under multiple export certificates arriving at slaughterhouses in different trucks. Animals going to direct slaughter must all go to the same destination since the truck is sealed at the U.S. border.

Animals don't need to be assembled in one place; the truck can make multiple pickups. However, in the case of direct to slaughter animals, the exporter should check with the slaughterhouse (management and/or Isis) that they agree with this procedure.

horses assateague horse foal wild md beach birth park island pony service control maryland national habitat naming mare1 auction herd
(Source: mdcoastdispatch.com)

Cattle and bison from different locations exported on the same export certificate: Because of the trace-back possibilities provided by the Canadian Cattle National Identification System, the USDA accepts that animals coming from different farms/assembly points be put on the same certificate as long as: The certificate HA1941 for the export of cattle or bison to the USA will not change for the moment.

There is no need to record the different places of origin on the export certificate or on a separate sheet. The certificate HA2183 for the export of cattle or bison for immediate slaughter gives the possibility of recording different places of origin, thus every physical location where the animals are exported from should be recorded on the certificate.

Previously imported bob calves re-exported to the USA for immediate slaughter For animals imported from the United States under Part III, Section 17 of the Import Reference Document on feeder calves, and re-exported with export certificate HA2610, the above instructions do not apply completely since the animals are placed in quarantine upon arrival in Canada. Bob calves from different locations may be assembled in one shipment as long as they all belong to the same exporter.

In the case where such shipment would be refused at the border, the exporter must have a contingency plan for quarantining all these animals in a place(s) that has/have been pre-approved for this purpose by the CIA district staff. The Export certificate HA2951 Yak for Immediate Slaughter to the United States of America must be used.

All inspection and certification procedures described in the section above related to slaughter category animals are applicable to the certification of yak for immediate slaughter except for the following: Age determination: only visual inspection and birth records (including birth farm records) as described above for bovine and bison can be used to determine the age of yak.

hooves horses neglected horse farm feet end rescue long emaciated foot days rescued manure three were hoof maryland overgrown found
(Source: www.nydailynews.com)

For animals imported from U.S. for temporary stay in Canada, if less than 60 days: A copy of the United States Health Certificate including a proof of the date of entry into Canada; No Canadian tattoo or branding is required; and The animals should bear an approved tag or a foreign indicator deemed equivalent to an approved tag under the livestock identification and traceability program (TRACE program). All animals imported from the U.S. which have been exhibited at a publicly recognized exposition in Canada are eligible to return to the U.S. within 90 days under special conditions.

A tattoo or brand (for cattle only) certification using certificate HA1941 an approved tag or a foreign indicator deemed equivalent to an approved tag under the TRACE program For cattle exported from Canada to the U.S. more than 30 days but less than 60 days before the date of re-importation into Canada, the animal must be accompanied by the following documents: Canadian import permit zoo sanitary export certificate of an official veterinarian of the U.S., or a certificate of a veterinarian endorsed by an official veterinarian of the U.S. that shows that the animal proved negative to test for brucellosis within 30 days before the date of importation.

Canadian zoo sanitary export certificate of a veterinary inspector, or a certificate of a veterinarian endorsed by a veterinary inspector, that clearly identifies the animal and states that it was exported to the U.S. The feedlot of destination must have prior approval from U.S. Veterinary Services to receive feeder sheep and goats from Canada.

Sheep and goats for export must have been inspected and found to be free from any evidence of communicable disease and, as far as it can be determined, must not have been exposed to any such disease during the 60 days immediately preceding the date of shipment. These tags follow the ISO 11784 standard format with 15 digits, and may be electronic or non-electronic.

Refer to module 2.1 Identification of livestock for further information regarding the use of Sofa tags and record keeping. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Regulations require imported goats from Canada to be officially identified with a unique individual identification traceable to the premises of origin.

horse maryland natasha
(Source: www.visitmaryland.org)

Goats may only be certified if the accredited veterinarian knows the birth premises of each animal being shipped. All numbers that appear on the ear tag must be recorded on the export certificate.

Note: While it is not a USDA requirement that the ear tag numbers be listed in ascending numerical order on the certificate, accredited veterinarians are encouraged to complete certificates in this manner. This practice will facilitate inspection at the U.S. port of entry and minimize delays.

In addition to the above official tag requirements, the sheep and goats must be permanently and humanely identified before arrival at the port of entry to the U.S. Each animal must bear a “C” mark applied with a freeze brand, hot iron, or other permanent method. The determination of the age of the animals may be based on information obtained from the Canadian Cattle Identification Agency (CIA) or Agri-traçabilité Québec (ATQ) databases, from other records that provide evidence (including birth farm records) acceptable to the accredited veterinarian, or on the examination of the dentition of each animal by the accredited veterinarian or their designated technician.

If the dental examination is used to determine age, it is preferable for the inspection to be conducted during the 14 days preceding export. Note: For the purposes of certification of sheep and goats for export to the U.S., an animal is considered to be less than 12 months of age if all the deciduous incisors are present.

Any sheep or goat that has shed one of the first deciduous incisor teeth is considered to be 12 months of age or older, whether the permanent incisor teeth have started to erupt. First image left column consists of a lamb's head with the teeth exposed by human hands holding back the animal's lips.

horse thoroughbred cat stray flickr maryland state permitted stowe rennett attribution statesymbolsusa
(Source: www.statesymbolsusa.org)

To the right of the first image is a top view drawing of a sheep's jaw with the teeth numbered and captions for “'median line” pointing to the center of the palate and the word “Lamb.” Second image left column consists of a lamb's head with the teeth exposed by human hands holding back the animal's lips with the caption “Two Tooth (1-2 years old) two permanent incisors” To the right of the second image is a top view drawing of a sheep's jaw with the teeth numbered and the caption “Age 1-1½ years old”.

Fourth image left column consists of a lamb's head with the teeth exposed by human hands holding back the animal's lips with the caption “3-4 year old”. To the right of the fourth image is a top view drawing of a sheep's jaw with the teeth numbered and the caption “Age 3-3½ years”.

The completed and signed health certificate and owner/exporter's declaration will be submitted to a CIA veterinary inspector to review and, if all requirements are met, it will be endorsed. Any incomplete export certificates will be returned to the accredited veterinarian for completion.

The accredited veterinarian or their technician must, on the day of export, return to the farm and apply CIA seals to the transporting vehicles, after verifying that only the animals listed on the export certificate are included in the shipment. The accredited veterinarian or their technician must record the number of animals in the shipment and the CIA seal numbers in the appropriate sections on the endorsed original health certificate, and initial the appropriate section.

During loading, if animals must be removed from the shipment after the health certificate has been endorsed by the CIA veterinary inspector, accredited veterinarians should not cross out any of these animals that are listed on the health certificate. The addendum must include a description of the animals that were not loaded and their official or approved tag identification numbers.

maryland country horse midwesterners finish line
(Source: midwesternersinmaryland.wordpress.com)

The routing of the shipment must be based on information provided by the exporter and must include the names of the main highways to be followed in Canada and the U.S. and the name of the location where the animals were loaded in Canada. Note: Each truckload constitutes one shipment; therefore, a separate original health certificate must be issued for each vehicle.

The CIA inspector will issue an official letter to confirm the change in the seal numbers. The export of sheep and goats to the U.S. must be done in vehicles that are sealed at the location from which the animals are being shipped.

To perform this function, accredited veterinarians or their technicians must be designated under the Health of Animals Act to affix seals. The CFIA's Animal Health district office will provide seals for the vehicles.

Once seals are applied to all possible exits of a vehicle transporting livestock, accredited veterinarians or their designated technicians must record the numbers on the official export certificate in the appropriate section and initial the appropriate section. Accredited veterinarians must submit, upon request, a list of the seals used and the corresponding export certificate numbers to the CFIA's Animal Health district office.

The sheep and goats for feeding will be unloaded at the U.S. port of entry for individual inspection. The shipment must be accompanied by U.S. Veterinary Services Form 17-29 (Declaration of Importation) and the official Canadian health certificate (HA2186).

horses maryland horse courses connected stay board mda gov
(Source: mda.maryland.gov)

He may also provide you with a sample of the Addendum for Animals Not Included in the Shipment, which can be printed on your official letterhead. Sheep and goats for export were born in the United States (U.S.) or Canada and have been in no other region, or were legally imported from a BSE -free region and have been unconditionally authorized to move freely in Canada for at least 60 days prior to exportation.

Sheep and goats for export must have been kept in Canada or the U.S. during the 60 days immediately preceding the date of shipment to the U.S. and, during those 60 days, Canada must have been free from foot-and-mouth disease, interest, and contagious bovine pleuropneumonia. Sheep and goats for export have been inspected and found to be free from any evidence of communicable disease and, as far as it can be determined, have not been exposed to any such disease during the 60 days immediately preceding the date of shipment.

Sheep and goats must have been subject to a ruminant feed ban equivalent to the requirements established by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The sheep and goats must not have tested positive or suspect for a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE).

The sheep and goats have not resided in a flock or herd that has been diagnosed with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). The movement of the sheep and goats must not have been restricted within Canada as a result of exposure to a TSE.

These tags follow the ISO ;11784 standard formats with 15 digits, and may be electronic or non-electronic. Refer to module 2.1 Identification of livestock for further information regarding the use of Sofa tags and record keeping.

farm horse maryland property md farms spring sold clear luxury estate acre auction meadow hill western
(Source: supremeauctions.com)

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Regulations require imported goats from Canada to be officially identified with a unique individual identification traceable to the premises of origin. Goats may only be certified if the accredited veterinarian knows the birth premises of each animal being shipped.

All numbers that appear on the ear tag must be recorded on the export certificate. Note: While it is not a USDA requirement that the ear tag numbers be listed in ascending numerical order on the certificate, accredited veterinarians are encouraged to complete certificates in this manner.

This practice will facilitate inspection at the U.S. port of entry and minimize delays. The determination of the age of the animals may be based on information obtained from the CIA or ATQ databases, other records that provide evidence (including birth farm records) acceptable to the accredited veterinarian or on the examination of the dentition of each animal by the accredited veterinarian or their designated technician.

If a dental examination is used to determine age, it is preferable for the inspection to be conducted during the 14 days preceding export. Note: For the purposes of certification of sheep and goats for export to the U.S., an animal is considered to be less than 12 months of age if all the deciduous incisors are present.

Any sheep or goat that has shed one of the first deciduous incisor teeth is considered to be 12 months of age or older, whether the permanent incisor teeth have started to erupt. First image left column consists of a lamb's head with the teeth exposed by human hands holding back the animal's lips.

horse friday maryland farm fence farms happy horses
(Source: www.flickr.com)

To the right of the first image is a top view drawing of a sheep's jaw with the teeth numbered and captions for “'median line” pointing to the center of the palate and the word “Lamb.” Second image left column consists of a lamb's head with the teeth exposed by human hands holding back the animal's lips with the caption “Two Tooth (1-2 years old) two permanent incisors” To the right of the second image is a top view drawing of a sheep's jaw with the teeth numbered and the caption “Age 1-1½ years old”.

Fourth image left column consists of a lamb's head with the teeth exposed by human hands holding back the animal's lips with the caption “3-4 year old”. To the right of the fourth image is a top view drawing of a sheep's jaw with the teeth numbered and the caption “Age 3-3½ yrs”.

The method used to determine the age must be shown in article 6 of the HA2185 certificate by striking out and initialing the unused option. The completed and signed health certificate and owner/exporter's declaration will be submitted to a CIA veterinary inspector for review and if all requirements are met, it will be endorsed.

Any incomplete export certificates will be returned to the accredited veterinarian for completion. The accredited veterinarian or their technician must, on the day of export, return to the farm and apply CIA seals to the transporting vehicles, after verifying that only the animals listed on the export certificate are included in the shipment.

The accredited veterinarian or their technician must record the number of animals in the shipment and the CIA seal numbers in the appropriate sections on the endorsed original health certificate, and initial the appropriate section. During loading, if animals must be removed from the shipment after the health certificate has been endorsed by the CIA veterinary inspector, accredited veterinarians should not cross out any of these animals that are listed on the health certificate.

horse racing maryland horses wild visit race equestrian roam famous national park its course
(Source: www.visitmaryland.org)

The addendum must include a description of the animals that were not loaded and their official or approved tag number. The routing of the shipment must be based on information provided by the exporter and must include the names of the main highways to be followed in Canada and the U.S. and the name of the location where the animals were loaded in Canada.

Note: Each truckload constitutes one shipment; therefore, a separate original health certificate must be issued for each vehicle. The CIA inspector will issue an official letter to confirm the change in the seal numbers.

The export of sheep and goats to the U.S. must be done in vehicles that are sealed at the location from which the animals are being shipped. To perform this function, accredited veterinarians or their technicians must be designated under the Health of Animals Act to affix seals.

The CFIA's Animal Health district office will provide seals for the vehicles. Once seals are applied to all possible exits of a vehicle transporting livestock, accredited veterinarians or their designated technicians must record the numbers on the official export certificate in the appropriate section and initial the appropriate section.

Accredited veterinarians must submit, upon request, a list of the seals used and the corresponding export certificate numbers to the CFIA's Animal Health district office. The shipment must be accompanied by U.S. Veterinary Services Form 17-29 (Declaration of Importation) and the official Canadian health certificate (HA2185).

horse maryland southern farm county mary land md property properties waterfront st farms barn acre equestrian saint tobacco pier charles
(Source: www.marielally.com)

The district may also provide you with a sample of the Addendum for Animals Not Included in the Shipment, which can be printed on your official letterhead. In both cases, the export health certificate must be issued by the accredited veterinarian who inspected the animal(s).

Horses certified on this certificate may enter the U.S. for temporary or permanent entry. Horses certified with the export certificate HA1964 entering the U.S. for a stay longer than 30 days after the date of inspection by an accredited veterinarian must be declared as permanent entry.

For example, horses exported for show or pleasure could qualify for this temporary authorization. Horses exported to the U.S. under “Temporary Customs Authorization” may enter without U.S. veterinary inspection and the certificate issued is valid for an unlimited number of importations into the U.S. during the 30-day period, provided that the EIA test is valid on entry to the U.S. Horses exported into the U.S. for claiming race, breeding or diagnostic testing and treatment may not be granted this temporary authorization, even if entering the U.S. for less than 30 days.

As far as it can be determined, no cases of African horse sickness, do urine, Flanders, surrey, epizootic lymphangitis, ulcerative lymphangitis, equine toxoplasmosis, or Venezuelan equine encephalomyelitis have occurred on the premises of origin or on adjoining premises during the 60 days preceding the date of shipment. The horses have not been in a country that is considered affected with contagious equine merits (CEM) during the twelve (12) months immediately prior to its exportation, except for those horses that have met Canadian import requirements for CEM for permanent entry.

Some states have additional requirements, such as the need for an import permit or equine infectious anemia (EIA) test certificate. The horses were inspected within 30 days from the date of export and found to be free from evidence of contagious disease and, as far as it can be determined, have not been exposed to any such disease during the 60 days immediately preceding the date of shipment.

maryland horse clipart transparent thoroughbred industry decal picks steam bloodhorse request webstockreview
(Source: marylandhorse.com)

The descriptions and marks indicated on the HA1964 and the description indicated on the HA1963 must match those indicated on the EIA test certificate CIA/Acid 3937 Equine Infectious Anemia (EIA) Serum Test Report and Certificate, or the digital photographs on the CFI A-approved electronic EIA test certificate. The animal's marks must be indicated in red on the export certificate and described in the appropriate sections.

The physical description includes marks, scars, brands, tattoos, whorls, cowlicks, etc. If available, the microchip number or tattoo should be recorded on the export certificate in the appropriate dedicated section.

If the inspection was done at the same time as the EIA blood sample was drawn, then these dates will be the same on the export certificate. The current export certificate does not show the signature date from the accredited veterinarian.

The HA1964 export certificate may be used more than once if the “Temporary” box is checked off, the exportation meets the “Temporary Customs Authorization” and each entry is made within 30 days of the date of inspection. The exporter/importer retains the original of the certificate and presents it to Customs each time the horse crosses the border.

The HA1964 and HA1963 export certificates are valid for entry to the U.S. for 30 days from the inspection date written on the certificate, provided that the EIA test is valid on entry to the U.S. (negative result within the preceding 180 days). Any incomplete export certificates will be returned to the accredited veterinarian for completion.

maryland horse industry pony racing state
(Source: marylandhorse.com)

Exporters are responsible to verify availability of the USDA port veterinarian and make an appointment if required. Horses certified with export certificate HA1964 entering the U.S. for a temporary stay (a period of 30 days or less after their inspection by the accredited veterinarian) are inspected at ports of entry by U.S. Customs officials.

They will not require a USDA veterinary inspection, if they meet the temporary stay authorization. Exporters should bring the original or a certified copy of their EIA test certificate (CIA/Acid 3937) to the border.

Black and white or color printed copies of the electronic EIA test certificate are both acceptable and can be used as proof of a negative EIA test result for export purposes. Effective May 1, 2018, the USDAAPHIS requires USDA import permits for shipments of permanent entry horses entering via a land border port between Canada and Alaska.

There are no designated land border ports on the Canadian/United States border to Alaska, thus import permit is required prior to entry into Alaska in order to facilitate process of inspections. Canadian horses may enter the US temporarily without a USDA import permit, but must exit the US by the 30th day post inspection as listed on the health certificate (HA 1964).

All corvids described on the health certificate must have been captive farmed and were not born in the wild. Animals for export are not the direct offspring of any animals that have been diagnosed with Chronic wasting disease (CD) nor have they resided at any time in a herd in which the disease has been diagnosed.

If less than one year of age, animals for export must be natural additions to the herd of origin. The herd of origin is enrolled in a Chronic Wasting Disease Voluntary Herd Certification Program that has been approved by the CIA and has achieved Fully Certified status.

The herd of origin is not known to have been exposed to any wild population infected with chronic wasting disease, Mycobacterium Boris or Rubella aborts. The premises of origin are recognized as free of tuberculosis and brucellosis, or there are no resident M. Boris or B. aborts susceptible ruminants, that have not attained negative test results for tuberculosis and brucellosis within the last year.

There must have been no direct or indirect contact between the herd of origin and any known source infected with tuberculosis (Mycobacterium Boris) or brucellosis (Rubella aborts). Neither tuberculosis nor brucellosis has been diagnosed on the premises of origin during the 5 years preceding the start of testing for export.

The herd of origin had been tested for tuberculosis and brucellosis within the last 5 years with negative results. Note: for the purpose this certificate, the wording USA export eligible herd means that the whole herd was tested for brucellosis and tuberculosis within the last 5 years with negative results as previously described.

Infection with M. tuberculosis complex (Mycobacterium Boris) in animals is a notifiable disease in Canada No occurrence of infection with Mycobacterium Boris has been detected in the herd for at least the past 12 months Corvids in the herd have shown no clinical signs of infection with Mycobacterium Boris or lesions at ante- or postmortem inspections for at least the past 12 months. During the 60 days before export to the U.S., the corvids for export and the herd of origin must have remained free from symptoms of infectious or contagious disease and, as far as it can be determined, have not been exposed to any such disease.

However, if the status of all responders can be established by comparative testing or by postmortem examination and tissue culture, negative contact animals may be considered for entry. CIA staff will perform the comparative testing within 10 days of the date of the MCT as per Aphid (Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service) TB program or more than 60 days after the MCT as per CIA protocols.

Note: A standard mid-cervical tuberculin (MCT) test performed to renew a herd status may qualify as an individual MCT test, provided that it meets the prescribed timeline (within 60 days of exportation) and provided that the herd has a valid negative status (no MCT reactor to the herd test). Corvids under 6 months of age at the time of export, when travelling at the side of their dam, are exempt from the test requirements (brucellosis and tuberculosis).

All the corvids must be identified with an official unique individual (Sofa or ATQ) ear tag, or tattoo and must also have a large readable bangle ear tag that allows the bangle numbers to be checked without offloading the animals. The completed and signed health certificate will be submitted to a CIA veterinary inspector to review and, if all requirements are met, endorse.

Any incomplete export certificates will be returned to the accredited veterinarian for completion. The original and two copies of the official Canadian health certificate must be issued for each vehicle in a shipment.

Enrollment in a provincial Chronic Wasting Disease Voluntary Herd Certification Program is not a requirement for Research Corvids. References A copy of export health certificates HA1891 and HA2973 are available at the CIA district office.

The animals have resided in Canada or the United States from birth or were legally imported into Canada from another region and have been free of any import quarantine or health related restrictions and able to move freely within Canada's national herd for a minimum of sixty (60) days prior to export. If the came lids are offspring of animals imported into Canada from a country other than the U.S., they have been free of any import quarantine or health related restrictions and able to move freely within Canada's national herd for a minimum of sixty (60) days prior to export.

The animals have been resident of the herd of origin in Canada for a minimum period of 60 days before export and do not originate from a premise containing ruminant or swine species that are not part of a herd recognized by CIA to be tuberculosis free. Neither M. Boris, M. tuberculosis nor B. aborts has been diagnosed clinically, by diagnostic test or by postmortem examination, in a came lid, ruminant and/or swine on the premises of origin within the 3 years preceding the issuance of the export certificate.

Animals less than 6 months of age and travelling at the foot of their dam must be identified on the health certificate and meet the required health status, but do not require testing for tuberculosis or brucellosis. During the 60 days before export, came lids must have had no direct or indirect contact with any animals that are not of equivalent health status.

Deaths during re-export: all animals over the age of 6 months that die during the 60-day period before export to the U.S. are subject to postmortem examination. Animals being exported to the U.S. will be transported in cleaned and disinfected trucks directly from the premises of origin or isolation facility to the USDA port of entry.

The accredited veterinarian must request first the Beat test and the sample must be sent to an approved laboratory. Upon examination before departure for export to the U.S., came lids must show no clinical signs of communicable disease.

The accredited veterinarian must complete the export health certificate by entering all required information according to the directions provided above. The completed and signed health certificate will be submitted to a CIA veterinary inspector to review and, if all requirements are met, endorse.

Any incomplete export certificates will be returned to the accredited veterinarian for completion. The health certificate is valid for a period of 30 days from the date of the examination.

Confirmation should be provided to the U.S. port veterinarian 72 hours prior to arrival. References A copy of export health certificate HA1940 may be obtained from the district office.

The swine must be inspected by the accredited veterinarian on the premises of origin within 14 days of export. After clinical examination, any swine displaying symptoms or evidence of contagious or infectious disease or exposure to contagious or infectious disease are not eligible to be certified for export to the U.S.

In the event of an outbreak of a foreign animal disease listed under article 4 below, the swine must be inspected on the premises of origin within seven (7) days prior to export. In the event of an outbreak of foreign animal disease, the swine covered by the health certificate did not originate from or transit through a current United States Department of Agriculture, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Services (USDA Aphid) recognized zone or region established due to the detection of ASF, CSF, FMD, SVD, or AD.

Swine which are tested or inspected for export to U.S. must be identified with a tag/ indicator approved under the Livestock Identification and Traceability (TRACE) program. Health of Animals (Sofa) ear tags or CIA allocated premises numbers are not allowed anymore.

Breeding animals may be identified with ear tags which bear a unique 15-digit number that follows the ISO 11784 standard format. Feeder swine may be identified with ear tags which bear a unique 15-digit number that follows the ISO 11784 standard format.

These tags can be either electronic or non-electronic; or ear tags which bear an official 5 digit alphanumeric CPC -designated herd mark unique to the production site; or ear tattoos or shoulder tattoos bearing a CPC -designated herd mark unique to the production site. In those instances in which tests have been performed, a copy of the laboratory report is to be attached to HA1938.

In the event of an outbreak of foreign animal disease, the swine covered by this health certificate did not originate from or transit through a current United States Department of Agriculture, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Services (USDA Aphid) recognized zone or region established due to the detection of ASF, CSF, FMD, SVD, or AD. The swine intended for export to the United States have not been imported into Canada from countries designated by the USDA as affected with FMD, ASF, CSF or SVD; nor are they the first generation progeny of such imported swine.

The swine has been in Canada for at least 60 days immediately preceding the date of export to the United States. The swine must be identified with a tag/ indicator approved under the National Livestock Identification and Traceability (TRACE) program.

The tag/indicator must have a unique identification number which bears the official trademark of the responsible administrator (Pig Trace). Pseudo rabies: The sample must be sent to the CIA Winnipeg laboratory and the ELISA test must be selected.

In the event of an outbreak of foreign animal disease, the swine covered by the health certificate did not originate from or transit through a current United States Department of Agriculture, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Services (USDA Aphid) recognized zone or region established due to the detection of ASF, CSF, FMD, SVD, or AD. The wild boars for export were not previously imported into Canada from countries designated by the USDA as affected with FMD, ASF, CSF, or SVD.

The wild swine must be identified with a tag/ indicator approved under the National Livestock Identification and Traceability (TRACE) program. The tag/indicator must have a unique identification number which bears the official trademark of the responsible administrator (Pig Trace).

A second permanent identification in the form of a plastic or metal ear tag, unique tattoo, brand or microchip is required. Animals for export must be examined by the signing accredited veterinarian within the 14 days prior to the date of export and were found to be free of evidence of infectious and communicable disease.

In the event of an outbreak of ASF, CSF, FMD, SVD, or AD, the swine must be inspected within seven (7) days prior to export. The accredited veterinarian who inspected the animals must sign the health certificate.

When required, the U.S. import permit number must be entered in the appropriate section. The results of tests that are performed to meet specific state requirements do not constitute part of the official certification and are not to appear on the export health certificate; however, the test results can be attached to the export document.

The accredited veterinarian must complete the export health certificate by entering all required information according to the directions provided above. The completed and signed health certificate will be submitted to a CIA veterinary inspector to review and, if all requirements are met, it will be endorsed.

Any incomplete export certificates will be returned to the accredited veterinarian for completion. Inspection, testing or certification is not required for swine consigned from the port of entry directly to a slaughter facility.

A statement signed by the exporter showing the farm(s) of origin and the approved U.S. slaughter plant to which the load is consigned must be presented to the USDA veterinarian at the port of entry. The most recent version of certificate HA3049 Export of swine for immediate slaughter to the United States of America must be used.

The animals covered by the health certificate have been inspected by a CFIA-accredited veterinarian on the premises of origin or where the animals were assembled within seven (7) days prior to the date of export and found to be healthy and free from any clinical evidence of infectious disease and, as far as can be determined, exposure thereto. The swine did not originate from or transit through a current United States Department of Agriculture, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Services (USDA Aphid) recognized zone or region established due to the detection of ASF, CSF, FMD, SVD, or AD.

The animals will be shipped directly from the premises of origin in Canada to an USDA Aphid approved slaughter facility in the USA. The truck/trailer license number as well as the date and time of cleaning and disinfection must be provided on the export certificate.

The exporter, agent or owner must obtain from the transporter a document certifying the cleaning and disinfection before loading, endorse it and provide a copy to the accredited veterinarian to be kept on file. The swine for export have been identified with a tag/tattoo/indicator approved under the Canadian National Livestock Identification and Traceability (TRACE) program.

The exporter should be made aware that they must arrange for USDA inspection at the port of entry. The veterinarian at the port of entry will conduct a visual health examination of the animals and verify the identification of the animals as well as the information on the official health certificate.

Veterinarians authorized certifying poultry and hatching eggs to the U.S. are also authorized to certify any avian species to the U.S. where the CIA export certificate requires signature by an accredited veterinarian. Poultry or birds certified with the HA 1943 and 1945 certificates must have been maintained in the region from which they are offered for exportation for at least 90 days prior to shipment or since hatching, except for show poultry or birds where they have been maintained in the region of exportation and/or the United States for the 90 days preceding exportation.

The import permit will contain the required conditions, which may include a quarantine period in the USA. Poultry means domestic fowl and pigeons, including any bird in captivity: chickens, doves, ducks, geese, grouse, guinea fowl, partridges, pea fowl, pheasants, pigeons, quail, swans and turkeys (and their eggs for hatching).

The flocks of origin and hatchery must have been inspected within 30 days of export and found to be free of any evidence of communicable diseases of poultry and, as far as it is possible to determine, must not have been exposed to any such disease in the 90-day period preceding the date of export. The flock of origin must have participated in a pullout eradication program recognized by Canadian veterinary officials.

For hatching eggs only, the addresses of all flocks of origin must be indicated on the export certificate. Newcastle's disease, fowl plague, or highly pathogenic avian influenza has not occurred on the premises of origin, or on any adjoining premises during the 90-day period preceding exportation.

The area where the premises of origin are located has not been under quarantine for avian diseases during the preceding 90 days. The exporter is responsible for determining and complying with any specific state or show requirements.

The birds must have been inspected within 30 days of export and found to be free of any evidence of communicable diseases of poultry and, as far as is possible to determine, have not been exposed to any such disease during the 90 days preceding the date of export. The flock of origin must participate in a pullout eradication program recognized by the veterinary officials of Canada or the flock of origin must have had its pullout status confirmed through the use of other sampling methods such as environmental/fluff samples within the 90 days preceding export.

Newcastle's disease, fowl plague, or highly pathogenic avian influenza has not occurred on the premises of origin, or on any adjoining premises during the 90-day period preceding exportation. The area in which the premises of origin are located must not have been under quarantine for avian diseases during the 90 days before export.

The exporter is responsible for determining and complying with any specific state or show requirements. The birds must have been inspected within 24 hours prior to export and found to be free of any evidence of communicable avian diseases and, as far as is possible to determine, must not have been exposed to any such disease during the 90 days before the date of export.

Newcastle's disease, fowl plague, or highly pathogenic avian influenza must not have occurred on the premises of origin or on any adjoining premises during the 90 days immediately before export. The area in which the premises of origin are located has not been under quarantine for avian diseases during the preceding 90 days.

The birds must have been individually identified by means of wing bands, leg bands or microchip, and the numbers recorded on the certificate. The exporter is responsible for determining and complying with any specific state or show requirements.

The accredited veterinarian must complete the export health certificate by entering all required information according to the directions provided above. The completed and signed health certificate will be submitted to a CIA veterinary inspector to review and, if all requirements are met, endorse.

Any incomplete export certificates will be returned to the accredited veterinarian for completion. The following export certificates have been developed for specific birds and situations.

Idaho: East port Maine: Houston Michigan: Detroit and Port Huron Montana: Raymond and Sweet grass New York: Alexandria Bay and Niagara Falls North Dakota: Unseat, Remain and Portal Vermont: High gate Springs Washington: Orville and Sums The USDA-APHIS requires USDA import permits for shipments of avian species entering the US via a land border port between Canada and Alaska.

The USDA-APHIS requires USDA import permits for shipments of avian species entering the US via a land border port between Canada and Alaska. If the rates enter the US through an air or seaport, an import permit is required.

Marie Minnesota: Brunette Montana: Oprah, Raymond, and Sweet grass New York: Alexandria Bay, Buffalo, and Champlain North Dakota: Unseat, Remain, and Portal Vermont: Derby Line and High gate Springs Washington: Orville and Sums The USDA-APHIS requires USDA import permits for shipments of avian species entering the US via a land border port between Canada and Alaska.

If the rates enter the US through an air or seaport, an import permit is required. Please note that an import permit is also required for raptors that are allowed to hunt (free flight).

The provision described above applies only to animals that have entered Canada for entry to a recognized exhibition (including rodeo). A specific exception exists for U.S. cattle and bison imported for less than 60 days for any other purpose, as described in Section 5.3.1.

The matter, hardly one of major concern for most people, comes up all too frequently in Harford County because of the plight of the Wazowski family of Bel Air. Eric and Wendy Wazowski live in a home on 1.98 acres outside the Bel Air town limits, and they have been trying to get official permission from the Harford County government to keep ducks on their property.

Last week, they went before the Harford County Council seeking permission to keep the fowl without being afoul of the law. Wendy Wazowski argued the family's ducks should not be considered livestock because they are not being used to make a profit or for food.

Then again, certain breeds of goats and pigs are considered pets, a status that doesn't necessarily preclude them from being kept in residential areas. Strictly speaking, it makes perfect sense to require lots be a certain minimum size in a residential area for the raising of livestock to be allowed.

If the county isn't able to accommodate people who want to keep slightly unusual pets under the current code, it should amend the code and set limits on ducks, the way limits are generally set on the numbers of other pets considered appropriate for residential areas. It is used to house pigs, sheep, quarantined horses, beef steers, and, of course, dairy cattle.

The livestock ring is also where pigs, lambs, dairy heifers, and beef steers are shown on Ag Day in front of thousands of visitors to our campus. In addition to the teaching labs, the horses are ridden by members of the Maryland Equestrian Club (MEC).

As part of the club's educational program, they assist with the daily feeding and care of the horses. Horses are often taken on trail rides at the nearby Airedale Community Park.

The building houses the office of the ANSI Campus Farm Manager as well as providing meeting, break room, and restroom facilities. Animal Science Student Aiken “AJ” Jones describes how the University of Maryland Campus Farm has influenced his educational experience and future career path.

Our Sheep Management class spends the spring semester on the farm learning basic shepherding skills. The farm features 3 main barns, a poultry house, two outdoor teaching arenas, an equipment/bedding/tractor storage shed, and an office building.

The ANSI Campus Farm Manager along with the “Farm Crew” work diligently to keep the animals healthy, ensure the teaching laboratories are running smoothly, and to keep the facility in tip-top shape for our many visitors. The Campus Farm is also home to our annual Ag Day livestock fitting and showmanship show.

Always held on the last Saturday in April, Ag Day is one of the best ways for students to gain hands-on experience with a variety of livestock species right here on campus! The committee is made up of 3 faculty, 1 staff member, 1 undergraduate student, and the ANSI Campus Farm Manager.

The ANSI Campus Farm utilizes two outdoor sand footing teaching arenas. From Route 1 (Baltimore Ave) coming from the south turn left onto Campus Drive.

Other Articles You Might Be Interested In

01: Slang For Truck In Spanish
02: Slaughtered Horses Are Used For Glue
03: Slice_when Rails
04: M.n.d.a.v. Dental College
05: Uday V. Doctor M.d
06: Uday V. Doctor M.d. Obituary
07: Udf Yearling
08: American Quarter Horse
09: American Stud Book Online
10: American Stud Book Thoroughbred Horses
Sources
1 en.wikipedia.org - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Stud_Book
2 www.registry.jockeyclub.com - https://www.registry.jockeyclub.com/registry.cfm