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Are Horses Really Made Into Glue

author
Daniel Brown
• Wednesday, 11 November, 2020
• 13 min read

Horses contain high levels of collagen which is a key ingredient in most animal-based glue. There are some wonderful benefits from this type of glue compared to artificially made glue (which we will come back to).

glue horses into turned did why start animals
(Source: www.animalshq.com)

Contents

The surfaces can be separated again with clean surfaces You can apply a new layer of glue on top of an old layer You can correct an irregular fit by heating up the glue It produces a tight joint that does not bend over time As you can see, there are some wonderful advantages that make animal glue better in some aspects compared to glue made from alternative sources.

When you’re working with glue that isn’t made from animals you will typically not have these advantages. Some factories might kill a perfectly good horse in order to turn it into glue.

So you don’t need to worry that your horse will suddenly be caught and turned into glue. This way the animal is being put to great use after it can no longer live a good life.

This wasn’t something people gave a lot of thought back in the days. We would eat the meat and try to think of other ways to utilize the bones, teeth, homes, etc.

Sometimes your fingers will stick together and this sticky substance is partly the collagen that is being used in the animal glue. Fish glue has been used for more than 10 years and it is used for glass, ceramics, wood, paper leather, and metals.

glue horses into turned why
(Source: www.animalshq.com)

So we do not kill animals in large quantities in order to make glue. This is especially great for art projects and finer woodwork like cabinetry and furniture.

The horse glue is typically being produced in France and other countries in Europe. So if we wanted to glue together two pieces of material we would have to use the collagen from dead animals.

Well, it’s actually illegal to eat horse meat in the United States. So oftentimes the dead horses are sold to foreign countries to be eaten.

But more often the dead horses are being delivered to a zoo in order to feed animals. The gummy bears are made from bones and muscles from dead animals.

As we mentioned above, we don’t use animals to produce glue to the same extent as earlier. Today the factories will typically produce glue called “polyvinyl acetate” (also known as PVA).

glue horses into turned why
(Source: www.animalshq.com)

It would harden at specific temperatures which was a good thing when you wanted to separate the two pieces. The ingredient mix is secret, but they have specifically stated that they do not use animal collagen anymore.

Other people argue that the laughing cow on Elmer’s glue bottles is a symbol of happy animals that got to live. Because they found other and better ways of producing glue more efficiently the cattle can now keep smiling.

In the old westerns and Bugs Bunny cartoons that pretty much formed my thought processes as a child, they would always threaten to send the old horse to the glue factory. You get points for acknowledging Cecil as the man, but if you’d done even a little of reading, you’d have come across the horse/ glue factory connection pretty often.

When asked how he achieved this, he replied, I whisper in the horse’s ear: Roses are red, violets are blue. They take fat and bone trimmings from grocery stores, waste scraps from restaurants, and dead animals.

STAFF REPORTS ARE WRITTEN BY THE STRAIGHT DOPE SCIENCE ADVISORY BOARD, CECIL'S ONLINE AUXILIARY. THOUGH THE SD SAB DOES ITS BEST, THESE COLUMNS ARE EDITED BY ED ZO TTI, NOT CECIL, SO ACCURACYWISE YOU'D BETTER KEEP YOUR FINGERS CROSSED.

glue horses did hazen natalie
(Source: www.ranker.com)

Collagen is a key protein in connective tissues (cartilage, tendons, ligaments) as well as hides and bones. It’s also the key ingredient in most animal glues, as it can be made into a gelatin that’s sticky when wet but hardens when it dries.

Other adhesives were made from egg whites, tree sap, tar, and beeswax, which the ancient Romans used to caulk the planking in ships. For fish glue, Theophilus recommended the bladder of the sturgeon, but alternatives included and “the bones of the head of the wolf fish.” The first commercial glue factory, started in Holland in the early 18th century, used animal hides.

Animal glue, popular for thousands of years, has fallen out of fashion in recent decades. Over the second half of the 20th century, synthetic glues have become more advanced, as they are cheap, uniform in quality, and have longer shelf lives.

Bookbinders are fond of them because they’re slow to set, allowing binders plenty of time to work. These days, dead and unwanted horses aren’t sent to the glue factory as often they are sent across the border, slaughtered, and harvested for their valuable meat.

(The United States’ longtime ban on slaughtering horses for human consumption was lifted this past fall, but the practice remains taboo.) The (icky) old saying “take the horse to the glue factory” originates from the 18th and 19th century, when ranchers would dispose of animals (horses) to factories that manufactured glue (Wikipedia).

glue horses did flickr nc cc
(Source: www.ranker.com)

In fact, no animals have ever been brought into our North Carolina manufacturing plant for glue production. This type of dry granular glue, which is mixed with hot water for application, has existed since ancient times.

Between 1500–1000 BC, it was used for wood furnishings and mural paintings, found even on the caskets of Egyptian Pharaohs. As the name suggest, the hides are soaked in a solution to extract the collagen (similar to bone broth today).

That collagen “slurry” floats to the top, is removed, dried and ground up into the crystals you see above. It is most commonly used in woodworking applications, as it has a number of reversibility advantages for hand work.

Our team has long-standing partnerships with some of the world's largest pharmaceutical gelatin users. They are formulated with a few additional raw materials, including: water, glycerin, Epsom salt, and corn sugar.

You often hear the expression that a horse past its prime is “sent to the glue factory,” but is there any historical basis for turning Mr. Ed into Elmer's? Because of their size and strength, horses are a great source of collagen, the main ingredient in most animal-based glues.

glue horses turned into why horse
(Source: www.animalshq.com)

Collagen is a key protein found in connective tissues like cartilage, ligaments, tendons, bones, and hides in animals. Although glue could technically be made from any animal, horses are large and muscular, so they tend to have a lot of collagen.

To begin the process of making glue, glue factories first collected horse parts from various slaughterhouses, tanneries, meat packing companies, and other places specializing in horse hides, skins, tendons, and bones. Next, the stock was cooked in boiling water to release the collagen protein and break it down into its glue form.

After several increasingly hot water treatments, the resulting glue liquor was extracted and reheated to thicken it. White glue is easy to make by combining the right amounts of milk, distilled vinegar and baking soda.

Glue, historically, is indeed made from collagen taken from animal parts, particularly horse hooves and bones. Later, people learned to make glue by boiling animal feet, cartilage or bones.

A simple glue can be made at home by mixing wheat flour and water. Even though Elmer’s old-fashioned white glue is made with a petroleum-based polymer (not milk, as many people think), it’s still non-toxic, meaning that your body doesn’t process it.

glue horses into turned horse why where
(Source: www.animalshq.com)

Some folks have been known to eat entire bottles of the stuff in one sitting, but it’ll most likely still give you a stomachache. In the early 1900s, the Borden Company learned that they could make glue from a substance found in milk called casein.

The company has since branched out to make a line of similar products, including tapes, epoxies, and other adhesives. The collagen in gelatin does come from boiling the bones and hides of animals processed for their meat (usually cows and pigs).

Collagen is a key protein in connective tissues (cartilage, tendons, ligaments) as well as hides and bones. It’s also the key ingredient in most animal glues, as it can be made into a gelatin that’s sticky when wet but hardens when it dries.

Remains of euthanized animals can be rendered, which maintains the value of the skin, bones, fats, etc., for such purposes as fish food. Depending on breed, management and environment, the modern domestic horse has a life expectancy of 25 to 30 years.

It was the first time eating horse meat was legally questioned on a federal level in America. These animal parts contain a chemical called collagen that’s good for making glue.

(Source: changecominon.blogspot.com)

Scientists have invented a chemical for making sticky stuff called polyvinyl acetate. The inhaling of some solvents can cause hearing loss, limb spasms, and damage to the central nervous system and brain.

My son just asked me this question, and since I never really gave it much thought before I had to look it up. Here's the answer from Straightdope.com: In the old westerns and Bugs Bunny cartoons that pretty much formed my thought processes as a child, they would always threaten to send the old horse to the glue factory.

You get points for acknowledging Cecil as the man, but if you'd done even a little of reading, you'd have come across the horse/ glue factory connection pretty often. It's mostly used as a figure of speech these days, but yes, horses typically were sent to the glue factory or rendering plant back in the days when they were mostly used as work animals.

These days, it's more common (an undocumented source says 90% of all domestic horses) for unwanted horses to be sent to a slaughterhouse if still alive, or a rendering plant (AKA the knackers, the knacker) if deceased. Rendering plants are the recycling links in the food chain.

They take fat and bone trimmings from grocery stores, waste scraps from restaurants, and dead animals. But as I say, the rendering plant isn't the only possible destination for a horse that's outlived its usefulness.

glue horses horse assume never
(Source: www.helpfulhorsehints.com)

Do factories really process out of glue provide answer and like a website or something This protein colloid glues are formed through hydrolysis of the collagen from skins, bones, tendons, and other tissues, similar to gelatin.

The word “collagen” itself derives from Greek koala, glue. These proteins form a molecular bond with the glued object.

In the old westerns and Bugs Bunny cartoons that pretty much formed my thought processes as a child, they would always threaten to send the old horse to the glue factory. You get points for acknowledging Cecil as the man, but if you'd done even a little of reading, you'd have come across the horse/ glue factory connection pretty often.

These days, it's more common (an undocumented source says 90% of all domestic horses) for unwanted horses to be sent to a slaughterhouse if still alive, or a rendering plant (AKA the knackers, the knacker) if deceased. When asked how he achieved this, he replied, I whisper in the horse's ear: Roses are red, violets are blue.

Animal (origin) glue is made from connective tissue, found in hoofs, bones, tendons, ligaments, and cartilage in vertebrate animals. A hundred years ago, many old horses were killed and sent to the glue factory.

glue horses horse really career did bridge successful takes working crybaby animal seek convenience owners pennsylvania sant van start
(Source: www.ranker.com)

But today, most glue is made from the bones and hooves of cattle, which thanks to the fast-food burger places, there are a lot of these by-products to be used. Although Elmer's firmly states their products are made from synthetic materials and are not derived from processing horses, cows or any other animals.

(Bihar Times)There’s an old joke about a jockey who when asked how he never lost a race, replied, “I whisper in the horse's ear: Roses are red, violets are blue. The primary ingredient of glue is collagen-- the main structural protein or building block of animals.

It is extracted by boiling down to a jelly the connective tissue like the skins, hoofs, bones, tendons, ligaments, and cartilage of vertebrate animals. When treated with hot water the collagen becomes soluble and the end result is either gelatin or glue.

Milk solids, known as casein, and albumin from cows’ blood are also used as a base for glue. It is no coincidence that the world's largest glue manufacturer is a Dairy called Borden Company.

Hoof glues have been used for things like stiffening bow strings, stiffening and adhering fabric to wood, creating thin lacquers to protect valuable objects as well as sealing glass into frames, or sealing ceramic containers. The best skin glue is known to be obtained from a mixture of the hide, ear and face clippings of the ox and calf.

glue horses today vortex progress horse magic paper
(Source: changecominon.blogspot.com)

The raw material or “stock” is first steeped from two to ten weeks in lime water to remove any blood and flesh which may be attached to the skin. Glues based on blood albumen are light colored powders that can be dissolved in water at the time of use.

With animal glue finding its way into textiles, jute, paper, dyeing, printing, furniture, plumbing, shoes, books, buildings, and automobiles, many communities that abjure animal ingredients are unwittingly using them thereby violating their religious and moral principles. In India, animal glue is still used in the manufacture of matches, books, textiles, cycles, and sports goods.

Starting from the traditional Indian “Hindi” to the emery nail file and sports racquet grip, even shoes termed as “non-leather” are sometimes glued using parts of a cow. This makes it all the more vital to phase out animal glues in favor of more humane and efficient substitutes.

This is been happening for hundreds of years, so many older products that require an adhesive (such as old books, for example) may be made with an animal glue that’s sourced from horses or large livestock. There are still natural glues on the market from both animal and plant-based sources and these have many functional uses.

Synthetic adhesives are the way of the future, and they’re what’s in the majority of the glue that you use today. The ingredients in glue now are rarely sourced from the collagen in animals.

horses reiki glue horse flickr karsun designs evolution did nd cc
(Source: www.ranker.com)

Rather, they’re more versatile synthetic ingredients that can be made with more consistency and regularity. Basically, glues require a mixture of a polymer into an emulsion so that there’s an adhesive property to the glue but it doesn’t immediately dry and stick to the vessel that it’s being held in.

Many adhesives are made from polyvinyl acetate, polyvinyl alcohol, cyanoacrylate, and ethylene vinyl acetate, but there are plenty of other chemical polymers that can create these glues. If you’re wondering “what is glue made of?”, it might be best to leave this question to the scientists.

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Sources
1 www.doversaddlery.com - https://www.doversaddlery.com/girths/c/3102/
2 thea.com - https://thea.com/Girths-Black-Girth/