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Are Horses Ticklish

author
Bob Roberts
• Monday, 14 December, 2020
• 7 min read

A horse who had been comfortable with your grooming but suddenly starts flinching may have an unseen injury that is causing him pain. Take the horse into good lighting and closely inspect the sensitive region for subtle swelling, insect bites, redness in the skin, rubbing or other unusual signs.

ticklish horse
(Source: www.youtube.com)

Contents

A localized sensitivity suggests some sort of physical cause, such as bruising or a skin irritation, which can be difficult to detect. You may not see any outward signs of tack fit injuries, for example, but they may make a horse touchy.

One simple test for soreness is to run a pencil eraser or your fingers down your horse's back along each side of his spine. On the other hand, if you conclude that your horse is just naturally ticklish, you'll need to adjust your routine to accommodate his quirky traits.

Start by rubbing something very soft, like a towel, over his body, then work up to “scratchier” tools. Be sure to praise and reward him when he does not react, and take lots of breaks to avoid overtaxing him mentally.

The former form of ticklishness, called nemesis, is widespread; many animals evolved the behavior to help with warding off harmful creepy crawlies such as scorpions and spiders. Paralysis is thought to have evolved in great apes as a means of social bonding, engendering light-hearted interactions between parents and children.

Some experts believe paralysis also helps youngsters hone their self-defense skills; during tickle fights with peers, kids develop reflexes to protect sensitive or vulnerable areas such as the neck and ribs. Over the past decade, neuroscientist and animal behaviorists led by Jack Panksepp of Washington State University have gathered considerable evidence that suggests rats “laugh” in response to being tickled.

(Source: www.youtube.com)

Furthermore, the chirps seem to signify joy; the rats will run mazes and press levers if they learn they'll be rewarded with a good tickle afterward. Ticklish horses have to be handled a little more carefully so as not to upset them. Ticklishness is actually part of the natural reaction to shake off flies, but some horses do seem to take it to an extreme.

You can sign in to vote the answer. Some are ticklish, but I wouldn't recommend tickling... that kicking response really hurts.

Anyway, my trainers solution is for me to use cat collars to tie my feet in place But I just wanted to check and see if anyone had any other thoughts on what I can do, or maybe on why he's doing this. I'm hoping I haven't out horsed myself... when this doesn't happen we settle into a happy partnership, especially in our flat work, but I would eventually like to show him in the jumpers and right now we feel miles away from that.

Or if it is because he's ticklish,” you need to get an experienced trainer on his back to intentionally stimulate his problem area, then deal with the bucking issue in a way that involves repercussions for him, not the rider getting thrown. A little unorthodox, but if he is that sensitive around his flanks, I would send him to a trainer and have them put a flank strap on him, let him buck it out and learn to deal with it. In the meantime, I would STRONGLY suggest that you get some lunge lessons to learn how to sit on your seat bones, relax your knees and drop your leg so you don't tip forward.

If your legs are going back far enough to reach his flank, there is little wonder why he is getting you off, you have put yourself into an extremely vulnerable position, as soon as your center of gravity tips forward, you're as good as off. I agree with Katy but please don't put a conventional flank strap on that you can't get off in a hurry.

horses palomino fancy horse tickled palominos pretty palamino hesse frauke yellow tack animals cute dream cheval scarlettjane22
(Source: www.pinterest.com)

Use a regular lariat rope and you can give them slack if things go south. I really hesitate to put this out there because of the risk, but it is an effective technique if you're smart and it may save you from getting hurt while riding.

You need to learn to focus on keeping your weight on your heels by riding with a long leg. Get him checked by a vet and saddle fitter and possibly a chiropractor to rule out pain.

I'm 6 feet tall so have long legs and I do tend to fall forward in the saddle. Anyway, my trainers solution is for me to use cat collars to tie my feet in place :) But I just wanted to check and see if anyone had any other thoughts on what I can do, or maybe on why he's doing this.

I'm hoping I haven't out horsed myself... when this doesn't happen we settle into a happy partnership, especially in our flat work, but I would eventually like to show him in the jumpers and right now we feel miles away from that. Or if it is because he's ticklish,” you need to get an experienced trainer on his back to intentionally stimulate his problem area, then deal with the bucking issue in a way that involves repercussions for him, not the rider getting thrown.

• Horses : 3 A little unorthodox, but if he is that sensitive around his flanks, I would send him to a trainer and have them put a flank strap on him, let him buck it out and learn to deal with it. In the meantime, I would STRONGLY suggest that you get some lunge lessons to learn how to sit on your seat bones, relax your knees and drop your leg so you don't tip forward. If your legs are going back far enough to reach his flank, there is little wonder why he is getting you off, you have put yourself into an extremely vulnerable position, as soon as your center of gravity tips forward, you're as good as off.

horse horses overo lethal eye paint pink syndrome disease tobiano poll evil bony tovero starved ride focus bareback source neigh
(Source: neighwhentheyrun.blogspot.com)

• Horses : 4 I agree with Katy but please don't put a conventional flank strap on that you can't get off in a hurry. Use a regular lariat rope and you can give them slack if things go south.

• Horses : 0 You need to learn to focus on keeping your weight on your heels by riding with a long leg. When the two of you are good at this then add a low crossed poles jump.

Trotting keeps a hind leg underneath and doesn't set him up to buck. Saddlebag is offline. Get him checked by a vet and saddle fitter and possibly a chiropractor to rule out pain.

Last evening my boyfriend and I were brushing the horses preparing to ride. Caliber, my thoroughbred, was twitching when the boyfriend would brush his spine.

I couldn't find any rain rot or anything suspicious on his back. Hope is the carrot dangled before the draft horse to keep him plodding along in a vain attempt to reach it.

tickled
(Source: www.pinterest.com)

Sometimes they twitch and act like they are ticklish when the saddle dozen't fit right or after a long ride that they are not used to. • Horses : 4 That's what I had thought myself but the last I rode him was about two weeks ago...or more.

But we did put his saddle on him last night to see how he would react, and he was perfectly normal. Hope is the carrot dangled before the draft horse to keep him plodding along in a vain attempt to reach it.

• Horses : 0 Take your thumb and forefinger on either side of the spine. Slide your fingers down the back from the withers to the hip with firm even pressure.

If your horses dips his back or shows any other signs of pain (ears pinning, kicking, pawing etc...) you've got a sore back. If he's not sore he may just be sensitive to the grooming. She will not tolerate curry combs and I have to use light pressure with bristle brushes.

But he might be sensitive being groomed some people call it “thin-skinned” but if he is probably more ticklish to harder brushes. • Horses : 3 my barrel trainers rodeo horse, had such sensitive skin that she couldn't even brush him, she could only baht him.

(Source: www.pinterest.com)

If I brush him or scratch him on a certain part of his back or belly he arches his back and tilts his head to the side and does that submissive teeth clacking. Yeah, I did the forefinger and thumb thing the first time, and he doesn't react whatsoever.

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