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Are Take A Bath

author
Elaine Sutton
• Tuesday, 17 November, 2020
• 7 min read

Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia. To experience or accumulate a large financial loss on a transaction or investment.

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(Source: www.keepcalm-o-matic.co.uk)

Contents

Millions of the company's investors took a bath when the CEO resigned and its stock began plummeting. A lot of stores started stocking huge numbers of the gimmicky fad toy, but now they're taking a bath on it as public interest evaporates. To accumulate large losses on a business transaction or an investment.

(Alludes to getting soaked, a slang expression meaning “being heavily charged for something.”) Experience serious financial loss, as in The company took a bath investing in that new product.

This idiom, which originated in gambling, transfers washing oneself in a bathtub to being “cleaned out” financially. Journalism a person or a company takes a bath, they lose a lot of money on an investment.

It is America's third-biggest bank failure and its stockholders have taken a bath. Investors in the company took a 35 million dollar bath on the company, which entered bankruptcy proceedings 18 months ago. Informal 1997Bookseller When the yen drops in value, as it is doing right now, we take a bath.

(American English, informal, business) lose a lot of money, for example on a business agreement or an investment: Big investors sold their shares before the price crashed, but small investors took a bath. Verb McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Informal To experience serious financial loss: “Small investors who latched on to hot new issues took a bath in Wall Street”(Paul A. Samuelson). Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.

To experience a major financial loss; also, to fail miserably. This slangy cliché dates from the first half of the twentieth century and originated in gambling.

It appeared in Businessweek on October 27, 1975: “Our profits won’t make up for the bath we took last fall and winter.” In the alternative sense, the University of Tennessee’s newspaper, the Daily Beacon, stated, “As. Sen. Robert Dole put it, the GOP ‘took a bath in elections for the U.S. House” (Nov. 4, 1982).

Then, plug the drain to start filling the tub with water, and put a clean towel near the bath, so you can dry off when you get out. Consider adding some bath bubbles, Epsom salts, or essential oils to the water as the tub is filling to create a more relaxing experience.

Keep the shower curtain drawn while the tub fills to trap in steam and make your bath feel more like a sauna. Take a bath is a slang term that refers to an investor who has experienced a significant loss from an investment.

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Stock-specific news, such a company’s earnings or an unexpected profit warning, may result in an investor taking a significant loss. For example, an investor would take a bath on Amazon.com, Inc., shares if the stock opened down 20% after a disappointing quarterly earnings result.

For example, if David buys Caterpillar Inc. for $160 a share, he could set up an automatic trigger to sell his holding if the stock trades below $140. Hedging strategies include using put options, short selling stock or purchasing inverse exchange-traded funds (ETFs).

For example, if Tim’s portfolio primarily consists of banking stocks, he could hedge by buying the Direction Daily Financial Bear 3X ETF. Put the loss into perspective: If investors take a bath on a specific stock or their portfolio, they should look at their long-term investment returns.

Use the loss for inspiration: After taking a bath on an investment, an investor should determine where they have weaknesses and improve in those areas. This idiom, which originated in gambling, transfers washing oneself in a bathtub to being “cleaned out” financially.

“Affect” vs. “Effect”: Use The Correct Word Every Time Jumping in a hot shower and washing dirt, oil, and sweat off your body seems like it would be hard to mess up.

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Good hygiene is an essential part of protecting your health, so establishing a solid, consistent showering or bathing routine is pretty important. Your skin might look better if you cut back to a few showers per week, especially during the winter months when the air is dry, and you aren’t sweating as much.

No matter which of these camps you fall into, it’s important to make sure you clean your entire body in the shower. In fact, dermatologists recommend showering in water that’s lukewarm or slightly warm.

Using a loofah, washcloth, or just your hands, apply bar soap or body wash to your body. Don’t forget to wash your legs and get between your toes with soap and water.

Rinse off any soapy residue with a little more water to make sure you’re not drying out your skin with scaly soap remnants. If you’re washing your hair, apply shampoo by squirting a quarter-sized amount into your palm.

Switch to lukewarm or cool water for the final rinse of your hair and your body. This will help seal conditioner into your hair follicles, encourage blood flow throughout your body, and give you a refreshing jump start as you step out of the shower.

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You’ll want to use moisturizing cream right out of the shower for best results because it seals hydration into your skin. This step is optional, but some people like to take a quick shower to get any dirt off their bodies before they soak in the bathtub.

Use a paper towel or cloth to wipe down the inside of the tub, removing any soap residue or stray hairs that may have gathered. But if you decide to do so, wash your hair first with shampoo, being careful to get the nape of your neck and your scalp.

Massage your hair with conditioner, paying special attention to your ends. You don’t need to scrub your skin hard or repeatedly to get dirt and oil off its surface.

Any loofah, washcloth, or scrubbing sponge should be kept clean and dry when not in use in your shower or bathtub. Bacteria can grow in these bath time accessories if they’re not dried and stored correctly.

Once you get used to the steps above, you may notice that you can cut back on the time you spend in the shower. Showering between 5 and 10 minutes is a suitable amount of time to spend soaping up and rinsing off.

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If you work out multiple times a day, spend hours outside, or work in the medical profession or as a first responder, showering twice a day might be an important part of keeping your body clean. But showering or bathing efficiently can save gallons of water, lower your energy costs, and restore precious time you might have been wasting.

By the end of the follow-up period in 2009, out of more than 30,000 final participants, the researchers documented 2,097 cases of cardiovascular disease, including 275 heart attacks, 53 sudden cardiac deaths and 1,769 strokes. Tub bathing is considered to have a preventative effect against heart disease by improving what's called “hemodynamic function,” the report said.

“Bad hemodynamics are either extreme high or low blood pressure states where the heart has to work harder, essentially. The editorial for the study points out that taking hot baths in pursuit of health benefits is not without risk.

Tub bathing may be associated with “sudden death, particularly in the elderly, by accidental drowning or heart attack triggered by a rapid change in body temperature, or by heat stroke in which the increased body temperature cannot be controlled” by sweating, the report said. While the study suggests that daily baths could help lower your risk for heart disease, that isn't the only factor to consider.

Brandt isn't convinced that bathing alone is the main reason for the study's findings of lower heart disease risk; it's more likely, he said, that regularly taking a warm or hot bath “can have a temporary physiological change that's similar to exercise,” and that other healthy lifestyle factors came into play. “The risk might be different for Americans compared to Japanese in the context where we carry a heavier burden of chronic lifestyle-related illnesses.

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Previous research involving heat exposure has found associations similar to those in the current study: A 1999 study on eight people with diabetes found bathing led to a lower fasting blood glucose, and sauna bathing has been linked with reduced sudden cardiac death and heart disease risk. They discovered this after tracking the bathing habits and cardiovascular disease risk of more than 61,000 Japanese adults for 20 years.

The bather simply stands under the water, gets wet, scrubs with soap and often a washcloth, and then rinses off. Children often take a bath each night and enjoy playing with small toys such as boats and rubber ducks.

Many adults, especially women, enjoy a soothing bath to get rid of stress at the end of the day. It is important to remember that when you take a shower or bath in the United States, you should be careful to keep the water inside the bathtub or shower.

Unlike bathrooms in many countries, there is no drain in the floor. If water gets on the floor it cannot go anywhere and must be cleaned up with a towel or mop.

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