logo
Archive

Best Kimberwick Bit

author
Christina Perez
• Monday, 02 November, 2020
• 11 min read

They are commonly used on ponies with small children because of the control the bits provide. All our English Berwick bits come with the Equestrian Collections 100% Satisfaction Guarantee.

horse kimberwick bit bits pelham pros types
(Source: horse-pros.com)

Contents

English Berwick bits provide mild curb action. They are commonly used on ponies with small children because of the control the bits provide.

Special Deals Berwick bits have a curb chain to help increase the amount of leverage or control. The Kimberwickbit applies tongue pressure using the upper rein slot to increase leverage.

The Kimberwickbit comes in a variety of sizes to suit the horse it is being used with. Choose a Kimberwickbit from our top brands like Happy Mouth, Steel, or Coronet.

All our Berwick horse bits come with the Horsepower 100% Satisfaction Guarantee. Berwick bits have a curb chain to help increase the amount of leverage or control.

The Kimberwickbit applies tongue pressure using the upper rein slot to increase leverage. Choose a Kimberwickbit from our top brands like Happy Mouth, Steel, or Coronet.

kimberwick bit hinged korsteel double bits horse
(Source: www.carouselhorsetack.com)

All our Berwick horse bits come with the Horsepower 100% Satisfaction Guarantee. A Berwick, or as it’s called in some places, a Kimblewick, is a common bit used in English riding and driving.

Because of its leverage action, it’s not used in some Pony Club events and dressage, but because it can provide a bit more “whoa,” many people like it for trail riding for the additional control it can exert on a horse that might be a little more strong outside the ring or arena. Both the names Berwick and Kimblewick refer to the same bit, but the Ureter type of either is a variation, with a slightly different action when the reins are pulled.

A Kimblewick should always be used with a curb strap or chain to prevent the bit rotating back too far in the horse's mouth. Lowering the hands will cause the reins to slide down the ring, and cause more curb action.

With either type of Berwick, the curb chain or strap prevents the bit from rotating too far in the horse’s mouth. When the reins are pulled back, the bit applies pressure to the bars of the mouth, the chin, and the poll.

Because the bit has the equivalent of very short shanks, the curb action is relatively mild. But, this doesn’t always happen due to rider skill, the horse’s training and behavior, or personal preference.

kimberwick showman roller mouth copper bit stainless steel qty
(Source: www.ebay.com)

With a plain Berwick, the action is more like a simple snaffle, as long as the horse or pony does not pull, and the rider's hands are light. This is a bit commonly used in general riding and provides more control on a horse that may be a strong puller or needs slight curb action to lower its head.

Which sounds great for me, as around 2 months ago I fell off my 4 yr old pony and broke my left humerus bone. Before I fell off we were thinking of sending him back to the trainer to get some education in a few things, now we defiantly think that (Gotta fatten him up first though, lost some fat in the winter).

But, that was the FIRST ever time he has bolted, so he is not a bolter, he just got spooked by the owners (of the property who we gist at) daughter (She was moving the wings to the jumps, and he is afraid of them). Haha) To give u an idea about the Kimblewick bit I'm talking about, here is a pic.

Kimblewick Cheeks The Kimblewick is a fixed cheek bit that is often used on horses and ponies that prove a little too strong in a snaffle; it is also often used by children to help them have some control should they need it. The Cambridge mouth is a very mild bit ; it is an unvarying mouthpiece, which means the pressure on the mouth doesn’t change very much, as it is a fixed mouthpiece.

This mouthpiece is super alternative to the straight bar for horses with a larger tongue, horses that are likely to have larger tongues are for e.g., Irish Draft x or the Dutch Warm blood. The bit puts pressure on the tongue and lips (corner of the mouth), it does use slight pressure on the bars depending on the size of your horses tongue, more than that of a Mullen mouth.

bit kimberwick horse kimblewick
(Source: www.equisearch.com)

My Arab mare can be ridden fine in a snaffle at gymkhana events (where she's in a confined pen lol) but get her out on the trail & it does next to nothing & I spend the whole ride pulling back or circling especially if she gets past a trot! And, of course, how your horse responds to it. I am not a bit expert, but I consider a bit to work well for a horse when they respect it, give to it with gentle pressure, and don't fuss with it or toss their heads.

It is other words, you want it strong enough for them to respect it, but mild enough that they are comfortable with it, will give to it, but not be afraid or irritated by it. I stuck a rider with harsh hands on Joe with it once, and he ended up with rub marks where the curb chain was (curb chain was on the loosest link :O) and rubs at the side of his mouth.

I also find that Joe settles into a snaffle a lot easier without any pulling “I-don't-wanna-do-dressage” crap after I've used the Kimblewick. I, personally, would never give a little kid or a rider who hangs off their horse's mouth a kimblewick simply because unless their horse has a mouth of steel, it'll probably do damage.

I love Kimberwickes, I believe they make it easier to collect and soften my horse with, but I'll go with everyone else and say you must have steady hands Someone correct me if I'm wrong....but I'm pretty sure it's called a Kimberwicke, not a Kimblewick.

:lol: Any who....the only thing with a kimberwicke is that is not a snaffle, it is a leverage bit, so it shouldn't be ridden on much contact, if any. You need mild, soft hands, although that is true for any bit.

kimberwick horse myler snaffle roller copper bit horseloverz english bits tack
(Source: www.horseloverz.com)

The pony doesn't sound like he needs a stronger bit ....just more training. Also, if the pony just started trotting, then cantered, it isn't technically a bolt.

I use a (jointed, slotted) kimberwicke with my mare- out of the couple bits we have tried out, she seems to respond to this one best. I do take a little contact with it, but I have steady hands, so I don't find any problem with it.

If your pony likes it and works well in it, then there's no reason not to use it. That being said, I don't recommend getting a stronger bit to help with a so-called bolter. Someone correct me if I'm wrong....but I'm pretty sure it's called a Kimberwicke, not a Kimblewick.

I have switched barns, and she is now not so spooky so I no longer use it and am back in a double joined snaffle. It does tend to make the horse more behind the vertical to avoid the pressure.

Anyone really with under 5 years riding experience beyond adolescence should be on something safe, quiet and broke so that they can learn to develop a stable seat, soft hands and an ability to really ride and not just be a passenger. The problem is not the bit, it is the mismatched experience level of horse and rider.

warmblood weymouth schule neue curb excellent bit
(Source: www.ebay.com)

Sell the horse before there are major issues created by your inexperience and buy something that you can learn from, not that will terrify you and break your bones. You'll want to work with a good trainer, so you can wean him out of the kimberwicke as he starts responding better (and you learn to control him better).

The next bit I like to step down to is a full cheek with a copper roller middle. I would learn the one-rein-halt ASAP. This quick stop maneuver can save your butt with a bolter.

This isn't a problem if we're in a position to do a one-rein stop (which works great for her) but if we're not then it takes a lot of consistent tugging to get her to eventually slow down. I have her in a tom thumb version right now where it has higher-rings which allows it to be used as a regular snaffle when I'm in the ring as well as lower rings which act as a leverage bit when we're on the trail & she responds wonderfully to it.

I'm interested in a kimberwicke as well because I have vacate reins & would like a bit that they would work better on, but one that has the control if she needs it (which as said, is only when we're running or else she's ridden on a really loose rein). Anyone really with under 5 years riding experience beyond adolescence should be on something safe, quiet and broke so that they can learn to develop a stable seat, soft hands and an ability to really ride and not just be a passenger.

The problem is not the bit, it is the mismatched experience level of horse and rider. Sell the horse before there are major issues created by your inexperience and buy something that you can learn from, not that will terrify you and break your bones.

I would have to agree that your pony definitely needs training, not a different bit. I agree that this doesn't sound like the best match... unless you have a trainer working with you both.

I would have to agree that your pony definitely needs training, not a different bit. I agree that this doesn't sound like the best match... unless you have a trainer working with you both.

My dad found a lady he knew who had a horse I could exercise for her. I eventually got up to the stage on that horse where I could take him to pony club as we had made a bond.

Then, my dreams were crushed as the lady my dad knew didn't own the horse, he belonged to the owners of they property she leased, and they decided to sell him. So I trained him to where I could eventually trot him with a saddle, bridle and no one leading us.

If you like for everything to be coated with sugar, the world of horses is not the place to be. I haven't read any of your other threads......but, honestly, if EVERYONE thinks you don't know what you're talking about, you either don't, or you need to work on rewording what you're saying.

ETA: And keep in mind, many of the people giving you advice are EXTREMELY experienced. HF is full of professional trainers, riding instructors, and champion riders.

You should store every bit of information they give you in the back of your head. My dad found a lady he knew who had a horse I could exercise for her.

I eventually got up to the stage on that horse where I could take him to pony club as we had made a bond. Then, my dreams were crushed as the lady my dad knew didn't own the horse, he belonged to the owners of they property she leased, and they decided to sell him.

So I trained him to where I could eventually trot him with a saddle, bridle and no one leading us. If u read my pony's barn page u should know the rest We weren't buying the bit to specifically stop him from bolting, just to give me more control over him.

I hope u all continue your lives and I bid you good day! You have already broken a bone with this pony... he needs professional training, as do you.

I have shown on the “A” circuit since I was 7 1/2... started out in walk trot cross rails then short stirrup. Then got a Thoroughbred the summer I turned 12 and showed him in children's hunter (3 foot class).

The trainer actually started him in a snaffle (which is also what I used when batting him for the first few weeks), then moved to a Blucher (Mullen mouth, not broken), then to the Berwick. This is not a bit I would usually consider (especially since it is not dressage-legal), but he seems to go well in it for now... I would like to wean him back to a Blucher, at least, if not a plain snaffle. With the snaffle, he was very, very fidgety and strong: constantly chewing, fussing, got his tongue over it several times.

It is only used on the high slot (the least curb action) with a loose chain, so it works similarly to the Blucher, but the low port seems to give his tongue enough clearance to be comfortable. Again, I was fairly surprised when this ended up being the best solution for him at this point in time.

Other Articles You Might Be Interested In

01: Ialha Stud Book
02: Address For Golden Corral
03: Address For Golden Corral Near Me
04: Address For Quarter Horse Congress
05: Adjectives For Unsound
06: Adjective For Euthanasia
07: Adjective For Sure
08: Waiver For Horse Riding Lessons
09: Warlander Stud Book Society
10: Warmblood Weanling For Sale
Sources
1 www.equinenow.com - https://www.equinenow.com/dutchwarmbloodweanlings.htm
2 www.equinenow.com - https://www.equinenow.com/warmbloodweanlings.htm
3 www.equinenow.com - https://www.equinenow.com/dutchwarmbloodyearlings.htm
4 www.dreamhorse.com - https://www.dreamhorse.com/d/116/weanling/horses-for-sale.html
5 www.equinenow.com - https://www.equinenow.com/warmbloodyearlings.htm